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How To Make Your Own Lavender Oil Infusion

Lavender has got to be my all-time favorite herbal scent. I purposely brush my legs against the plants when I walk along my garden so I can catch a whiff of their glorious fragrance. With a little work, I can preserve and enjoy the smell and its healing properties long after the blooms have died off.

Although not as strong as a distilled essential oil, a lavender oil infusion produces the same fragrance and can serve the same purpose without the need for dilution. Here's how I made mine:

You'll need:

  • a pale colored oil with a mild scent (olive, almond, or jojoba work well)
  • fresh lavender blooms, not completely opened
  • a plastic (Ziploc) bag and wooden spoon or mallet (or a mortar and pestle)
  • a glass jar with lid
  • a piece of cheesecloth or muslin, large enough to cover the mouth of your jar
  • a smaller jar in which to pour the strained oil

Directions:

1. Place the lavender heads in the Ziploc bag and seal tightly. Green leaves and stems can be added too, but keep anything woodsy or branch-like out.
2. Tap the flowers lightly with the wooden mallet or spoon to bruise them so they can release their fragrance.

3. Stuff the large glass jar full and pour in enough oil until they are covered. 4. Seal the jar and shake well. Set aside for 48 hours for the flowers to steep.

5. After 48 hours, strain the oil with a cheesecloth into a dark colored jar and discard the flowers and stems. Store in a cool, dark place.

You'll find the aroma to be quite subtle, but it will become more pronounced when it's warmed or rubbed into your skin. Stay tuned for a luxurious, all-natural hand cream recipe that uses the oil we've just created.